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Today’s Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) results confirm the University of Oxford’s world leading position in medical sciences research.

The Department of Physiology, Anatomy & Genetics formed part of the University’s REF return under the Biological Sciences unit of assessment and we are delighted that out of the 44 institutions making a return under this unit of assessment, Oxford returned the greatest volume of world leading (4*) ranked activity.

Read more on the University's website and on the Medical Sciences Division's website

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