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To mark Valentine's Day this year, the British Heart Foundation (BHF) are hoping to break the world record for the longest chain of paper hearts, in an attempt to raise money that will fund life-saving research. 

The current record stands at 8,525 paper hearts but with the help of volunteers and supporters, BHF hope to beat this.

Multiple research groups here at DPAG will be taking part by filling out and then donating paper hearts, or 'Love Notes', which will form part of the world record-breaking chain.  

People all around the UK can get involved too, by visiting a local BHF shop, purchasing a Love Note for a donation of £2, and writing their own message of love on the paper heart. 

The money raised from the project will fund important research into cardiac health, including the very research that goes on here in the department. 

For more information on the fundraiser and how you can get involved, visit the BHF website

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