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Members of our Department remember the renowned cell physiologist who has passed away this month at age 71.

David C. Gadsby FRS was best known for his studies determining the mechanisms by which charged particles called ions move across cell membranes. He studied both the processes responsible for basic physiology, such as the rhythmic beating of the heart, and those responsible for pathology, such as cystic fibrosis.

David was well known to many members of our Department.

Head of Department, Professor David Paterson, says: "We have lost a champion of cell physiology and a close friend."

Associate Professor Ana Domingos, says: "I had the pleasure to meet him during my days at Rockefeller, via one of his doctoral trainees. I also had the pleasure to visit his vacation house and taste his wife Patricia's creative gastronomy applied onto a fish that David caught himself."

Professor Frances Ashcroft says: "David was a very great scientist, a marvellous mentor, and a wonderful person. Many of us in the Department have lost a great friend."

Dr Natascia Vedovato says: "He was a wonderful mentor. We all loved him more as a father than as a boss. He and Patricia always called us their kids. They have been part of my family since I landed in his lab, we spent holiday time together as much as work time. They cried over my wedding and my first born. We celebrated so much together! David always said that every success, small or big, calls for celebration, and so I’ve tried to do that!"

You can read more information on the Rockefeller University websitewhere David was Head of the Laboratory of Cardiac and Membrane Physiology.

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