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An in-depth look into a collaborative DPAG, Chemistry and Oxford Martin School project pioneering a radical new approach in which the brain is repaired with 3D-printed neural tissues.

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Interviewees

Project Collaborators

Hagan Bayley

Professor of Chemical Biology

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Linna Zhou

Oxford Martin Fellow

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Funder

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Related Images

Image shows Day 13, GFAP Tuj1 vGlut1 at top, image below of brain progenitor cells differentiating into neurons and astrocytes 13 days after 3D printing.

Human brain progenitor cells differentiate into neurons and astrocytes 13 days after 3D printing.

Adapted from Zhou et al., Advanced Materials, June 2020

cortexofmutantmouse.jpg

Layer 6 (green) and layer 5 (red) of the cortex of a Pax 6 mutant mouse cerebral cortex.

Adapted from Tuoc et al., Journal of Neuroscience, July 2009

chickbrain.png

Clonally-related cells labelled in a chick brai.

Adapted from García-Moreno et al., Development, April 2014

Related Publications

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Lipid‐Bilayer‐Supported 3D Printing of Human Cerebral Cortex Cells Reveals Developmental Interactions

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Bayley H. et al, (2020), Advanced Materials

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A Tissue-Like Printed Material

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Bayley H. et al, (2013), Science, 340, 6128, 48-52
 
 

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