Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you will not see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.
Skip to main content

Research groups

Giacomo Bertuzzi

Postgraduate Student

I gained my BSc degree in Biology at the University of Parma, where I became fascinated by neuroscience during an internship in the lab of Prof. Vittorio Gallese, studying self-disturbance in schizophrenia. Then, the University of Trieste and the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) offered me a multidisciplinary training in both basic and applied neurobiology so that in two years I gained my International MSc degree in Neuroscience. For my MSc thesis, I spent one year in Oxford, at the Department of Physiology, Anatomy, and Genetic (DPAG) in the group of Prof. Mike Glitsch and at The John Radcliffe Hospital in the group of Prof. Alastair Buchan, working on human brain vascular pericytes and their response to alteration in extracellular pH. Afterward, I moved to Sweden where I worked in the group of Prof. Christer Betsholtz at the Uppsala University's Rudbeck Laboratory. During my experience with Prof. Betsholtz, I worked on brain vascular pericyte physiology in two different mice models.

In 2017, I decided to start my DPhil and I came back to Oxford at DPAG and join the Ion Channels and Disease Initiative (OXION) funded by the Wellcome Trust. I started investigating the mechanosensing properties of a proton-sensing G-coupled receptor, under the mentorship of Prof. Glitsch, and then experienced the study of neuronal activity in Drosophila, under the supervision of Prof. Gero Miesenboeck. What fascinated me the most was the potential of visualizing and controlling the activity of a neuronal network, and subsequently the behavior, working on the expression of particular ion channels in the cells of interests. Currently, I am studying sleep homeostasis, focusing on chronic two-photon imaging of neuronal activity in Drosophila, in the group of Prof. Miesenboeck.