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In this study, the authors performed deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (SACC) in a patient with a history of bipolar disorder. After a right thalamic stroke, intractable depression without mood elevation or a mixed state developed in this patient. He underwent bilateral SACC DBS and died 16 months afterwards. Anatomical connections were studied in this patient preoperatively and postmortem using diffusion tractography (DT). A comparison of in vivo and high resolution ex vivo connectivity patterns was performed as a measure of the utility of in vivo DT in presurgical planning for DBS. Diagnostic measures included neuropsychological testing, preoperative and ex vivo DT, and macroscopic neuropathological assessment. Post-DBS depression rating scores did not improve. In vivo and ex vivo DT revealed markedly reduced limbic projections from the thalamus and SACC to the amygdala in the right (stroke-affected) hemisphere. A highly selective right mediothalamic lesion was associated with the onset of refractory depression. Reduced amygdalar-thalamic and amygdalar-SACC connections could be a contraindication to DBS for depression. Correspondence between preoperative and higher resolution ex vivo DT supports the validity of DT as a presurgical planning tool for DBS.

Original publication

DOI

10.3171/2009.2.JNS081299

Type

Journal article

Journal

J Neurosurg

Publication Date

10/2009

Volume

111

Pages

780 - 784

Keywords

Amygdala, Deep Brain Stimulation, Depression, Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Gyrus Cinguli, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Thalamus