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Prolonged wakefulness or a lack of sleep lead to cognitive deficits, but little is known about the underlying cellular mechanisms. We recently found that sleep deprivation affects spontaneous neuronal activity in the neocortex of sleeping and awake rats. While it is well known that synaptic responses are modulated by ongoing cortical activity, it remains unclear whether prolonged waking affects responsiveness of cortical neurons to incoming stimuli. By applying local electrical microstimulation to the frontal area of the neocortex, we found that after a 4 h period of waking the initial neuronal response in the contralateral frontal cortex was stronger and more synchronous, and was followed by a more profound inhibition of neuronal spiking as compared with the control condition. These changes in evoked activity suggest increased neuronal excitability and indicate that, after staying awake, cortical neurons become transiently bistable. We propose that some of the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation may be a result of altered neuronal responsiveness to incoming intrinsic and extrinsic inputs.

Original publication




Journal article


J Sleep Res

Publication Date





239 - 250


Animals, Electric Stimulation, Electroencephalography, Evoked Potentials, Frontal Lobe, Male, Neocortex, Neurons, Rats, Rats, Inbred WKY, Sleep, Sleep Deprivation, Time Factors, Wakefulness