Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you will not see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Deep brain stimulation has shown remarkable potential in alleviating otherwise treatment-resistant chronic pain, but little is currently known about the underlying neural mechanisms. Here for the first time, we used noninvasive neuroimaging by magnetoencephalography to map changes in neural activity induced by deep brain stimulation in a patient with severe phantom limb pain. When the stimulator was turned off, the patient reported significant increases in subjective pain. Corresponding significant changes in neural activity were found in a network including the mid-anterior orbitofrontal and subgenual cingulate cortices; these areas are known to be involved in pain relief. Hence, they could potentially serve as future surgical targets to relieve chronic pain.

Original publication

DOI

10.1097/WNR.0b013e328010dc3d

Type

Journal article

Journal

Neuroreport

Publication Date

12/02/2007

Volume

18

Pages

223 - 228

Keywords

Brain, Brain Mapping, Chronic Disease, Deep Brain Stimulation, Functional Laterality, Gyrus Cinguli, Humans, Magnetoencephalography, Male, Middle Aged, Nerve Net, Pain, Intractable, Phantom Limb, Predictive Value of Tests, Prefrontal Cortex, Treatment Outcome