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David smiles to the camera sitting at his desk in his office next to the window.

 (c) John Cairns, used by permission of The Warden & Fellows of Merton College 

Congratulations are in order for DPAG's Head of Department, Professor David Paterson, who has been welcomed by the Physiological Society as the incoming President-elect. 

David will take office from the Annual General Meeting on 16th September 2018. 

David Eisner, President of The Physiological Society, commented on the appointment and that of other incoming roles, "I am delighted to welcome such strong candidates to the roles and hope they enjoy their time on Council".

To find out more, click here.

 

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