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Many congratulations go to both Prof Paul Riley and Prof John Stein on their recent election as Fellows of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

Six medical researchers at Oxford University have been elected as Fellows of the Academy of Medical Sciences. Professors Richard Cornall, Anke Ehlers, Gary A. Ford, Fiona Powrie, Paul Riley and John Stein are among the 44 new Fellows announced today by the Academy.

The honour recognises outstanding contribution to the advancement of medical science, innovative application of scientific knowledge, or conspicuous service to healthcare.

Professor Sir John Tooke, President of the Academy of Medical Sciences, said: 'The Academy of Medical Sciences represents the excellence and diversity of medical science in the UK, and this is evident in the broad range of expertise demonstrated by this year's new Fellows. They each bring a unique perspective which we will value.

'Their election is a much-deserved honour for the outstanding achievements they have shown throughout their careers. I know they will contribute greatly to the Academy, and I am delighted to welcome them all to the Fellowship.'

The new Fellows will be formally admitted to the Academy at a ceremony on Wednesday 2 July 2014.

Professor Richard Cornall is Professor of Immunology, University Lecturer in Renal Medicine and Honorary Consultant Physician at the University of Oxford. His research aims to understand how the immune system is formed and regulated, as well as the causes of autoimmunity.

Professor Anke Ehlers FBA is Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow and Professor of Experimental Psychopathology at the University of Oxford. Her research focuses on anxiety disorders – in particular post-traumatic stress disorder, social anxiety disorder and panic disorder.

Professor Gary A. Ford CBE is Chief Executive Officer, Oxford Academic Health Science Network; Stroke and Cardiovascular Theme Director, NIHR Clinical Research Network; Consultant Stroke Physician, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust; and Visiting Professor of Clinical Pharmacology at Oxford University. His research interests include acute stroke therapies and early diagnosis of stroke.

Professor Fiona Powrie FRS is Sidney Truelove Professor of Gastroenterology at the University of Oxford. Her research has included work on the interactions between the bacterial intestinal flora and the immune system.

Professor Paul Riley is British Heart Foundation Professor of Regenerative Medicine and Chair of Development and Reproduction in the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics at the University of Oxford. His research centres on cardiovascular development, repair and regeneration.

Professor John Stein is Emeritus Professor of Physiology at the University of Oxford. His research focuses on how vision controls movement in animals, patients with movement disorders, dyslexic children and antisocial offenders.

Source: Oxford News

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