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The Novo Nordisk Fellowship programme is currently recruiting three postdoctoral fellows and one clinical research training fellow.

Novo Nordisk has agreed up to four postdoctoral fellowships to work within the field of Diabetes. There are eight excellent projects that are available and potential postdoctoral positions in DPAG are associated with Professor Fran Ashcroft, Dr Damian Tyler and Dr Lisa Heather.

See http://www.rdm.ox.ac.uk/novo-nordisk-fellowships for more details.

The closing date for receipt of applications is noon on Friday 16 May 2014.

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