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As part of the Department's ongoing programme of refurbishment, the Burdon Sanderson Cardiac Science Centre entrance has recently been given a new lease of life.

Part of the stairwell has been repainted in the British Heart Foundation (BHF) official red, new signing has been ordered and an enormous BHF banner has been hung the length of the stairwell.

New lighting has been installed and a deep clean of the area was undertaken following the work.

The opportunity was also taken to refresh the artwork. As you can see below, John Burdon Sanderson looks quite at home amongst the scientific imagery also displayed.

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