Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you will not see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Congratulations are in order to Associate Professor Neil Herring on being made a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians.

Neil Herring Profile.jpg

Associate Professor of Cardiovascular Physiology and Consultant Cardiologist Neil Herring has been made a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians (FRCP).

The Fellowship is an accolade awarded to distinguished consultants recognising their ongoing contribution to the profession, and is held by some of the most exceptional and innovative physicians in the world.

 

 

 

I am honoured to receive this recognition from the RCP Council. I have greatly admired and respected many senior colleagues who have held this award throughout my medical career and it is humbling to be able to count myself as part of that same group. - Prof Herring

The Royal College of Physicians, founded in 1518, is the British professional body responsible for accreditation of physicians through post-graduate examinations and is dedicated to improving the practice of medicine.

Similar stories

Fellowship awarded to Huriye Atilgan to enhance our understanding of value-based decision-making

Congratulations are in order for Postdoctoral Research Scientist Dr Huriye Atilgan who has been awarded a prestigious Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellowship funded by the Wellcome Trust.

Frances Ashcroft and Denis Noble honoured by the IUPS Academic of Physiology

Professors Dame Frances Ashcroft and Denis Noble have been elected Fellows of the the International Union of Physiological Sciences (IUPS) Academy of Physiology in the inaugural year of its Fellowships.

Sherrington Talks 2021 Prize Winners

The 2021 Sherrington talks were presented by graduate students in their third year of DPhil research study.

Iron deficiency anaemia in early pregnancy increases risk of heart defects, suggests new research

In animal models, iron deficient mothers have a greatly increased risk of having offspring with congenital heart disease (CHD). The risk of CHD can be greatly reduced if the mother is given iron supplements very early in pregnancy. Additionally, embryos from a mouse model of Down Syndrome were particularly vulnerable to the effects of maternal iron deficiency, leading to a higher risk of developing severe heart defects.

Nicola Smart to deliver John French Lecture

The British Atherosclerosis Society's John French Memorial Lecture is named in honour of the Oxford-based pathologist, Dr John French, who made seminal observations and contributions to the field of cardiovascular pathology.