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Summit Therapeutics plc. have announced a multi-year extension of its exclusive strategic alliance with the research teams of Professor Dame Kay Davies, Professor Steve Davies (Department of Chemistry) and Professor Angela Russell (Departments of Chemistry and Pharmacology) until November 2019, with an option to extend it for a further 12 months, to support and accelerate development of future generation utrophin modulators for the treatment of the progressive muscle wasting disorder, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).

Summit will continue to sponsor a drug discovery and development programme in the University of Oxford research laboratories to identify and develop oral utrophin modulators for the treatment of DMD. This research programme, originally running to November 2016, will now continue until November 2019 with an option to extend it for a further 12 months. As part of the extension, Summit will increase the funding to £0.83 million a year starting in November 2015.

For further information see: http://hsprod.investis.com/servlet/HsPublic?context=ir.access&ir_option=RNS_NEWS&ir_client_id=4747&item=2261650321178624

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