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Yu-Ling Ma and her team's paper "Ion Channel Targeted Mechanisms of Anti-arrhythmic Chinese Herbal Medicine Xin Su Ning" has been published in Frontiers in Pharmacology.

Yu-Ling

Xin Su Ning (XSN) is a Chinese patented and certified herbal medicine used to treat premature ventricular contractions. A newly published Ma Group study demonstrates XSN’s clinical antiarrhythmic efficacy of 12 years’ use in China without adverse reactions being officially reported.

"The method used and the standard achieved bear high quality and the clinically relevant research in cellular electrophysiology on a traditional herbal medicine aimed to illuminate its clinical antiarrythmic mechanisms." - Dr Yu-Ling Ma.

XSN is only available in China, so the team's discoveries could pave the path for translating XSN to an international standard antiarrhythmic medicine through common effort.

"Due to the multi-component nature of XSN, further studies will reveal the mechanisms of the multi-targeting action of XSN that would help to advance the latest understanding that cardiac arrhythmic diseases are multifactorial and dynamic.

Further studying the action mechanisms of XSN may also help to explain how the multicomponent action helps to reduce/eliminate the adverse reactions that single chemical antiarrhythmic drugs often possess, which has led to concerns regarding the safety of antiarrhythmic drugs used clinically." - Dr Yu-Ling Ma.

The full paper can be viewed here.

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